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NEWS: [See all News]
WWII D-Day veteran, awarded France's Legion of Honor
It’s June 6, 1944, Joseph Petrucci is standing shoulder-to-shoulder with 30-some fellow comrades in a landing craft hurtling through the English Channel toward Omaha Beach. Read more...
[Posted: 2016-04-29 07:24:18]
D-Day veteran Verdun Hayes celebrates 100th birthday
D-Day veteran Verdun Hayes made the jump at Dunkeswell Airfield near Honiton, Devon, to raise money for the North Devon Hospice. Read more...
[Posted: 2016-04-28 06:29:32]
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WALL - IN MEMORY OF: [See all Messages]
PAVLOVSKY WILLIAM L
370TH FIGHTER GROUP
I am a proud American from the great state of California. When I was in Normany this Summer, I visited the American Cemetary with my family. I saw the Grave of Lt. Pavlovsky. I saw that he was from California also. I took a picture of his gravestone so I could bring him back home not in body but
Honored by John Winters
[Posted: 2017-12-01 07:31:03]
BUNCIK AUGUST B
USS LCI(L)-94
On November 1st, 2017, I visited the American Cemetery at Omaha Beach. It was very moving to see the lines of white crosses. I had the honor to place a Coast Guard Flag and render a salute at the grave site of this fallen Coast Guardsman. With many thanks for your sacrifice. CWO4 Terry Manning
Honored by Terry Manning
[Posted: 2017-11-16 23:24:02]
   1 - 2 / 110 messages   
OMAHA BEACH MEMORIAL - TESTIMONIES
Partager
Signalman 3c Albert J. Berard

US Navy
LCT 538


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As we were approaching Easy Red Beach, there were already hundreds of bodies floating by the ships. As the ships’ ramps were being lowered, the troops leaving the ships were getting machine gunned right there and falling into the water. Many of the ones that made it drowned because their upper torsos were heavily weighted with their rifles, hand grenades and all the ammunition they were holding overhead to keep from getting wet. In addition, any soldier that went off a ramp and whose feet didn’t hit bottom was immediately turned head-down and drowned. All these poor soldiers had a "life belt" about six inches wide hung low around their bodies, which caused them to flip over. You could see them floating by with their legs up out of the water. As other soldiers noticed what was happening, they would remove the life belt and go in without the life preserver.
One thing that I will never forget is the sound of the shells going by overhead, as well as the sound of those hitting the ship. Those German 88 projectiles would make an awful, whining noise as they went by. They were being fired at us from very close range. One of the projectiles hit us at the starboard side of the gun tub, and it must have hit at such an angles that it didn’t detonate, but went round and around in that gun tub until it just lost all of its energy and came to a stop without exploding. That saved the gunners that were at that station.
We had hit the beach at around 7:30 a.m. and because of shelling from shore had had to back off almost immediately, already with severe damage and casualties. As we were backing off, the current caused us to drift to the starboard and into an obstacle with a mine attached to it. We ended up getting off the beach with damage to two waterproof compartments; because of their being flooded we began to list. Later on when we tried to beach again to unload troops and vehicles, we couldn’t get close enough to solid ground. When we lowered the ramp, the vehicles drove off and disappeared into the water. When we landed the first time it was total chaos, with bodies floating all around plus body parts flying through the air.

Posted: July 16, 2011
Copyright: Laurent Lefebvre