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NEWS: [See all News]
Sub-Lieutenant George "Jimmy" Green, 551 Flotilla, has died.
We have just learned that Jimmy Green has died. Sub-Lieutenant George Green carried the men of the A company, 116th Regiment, 29th Division onto Dog Green, Omaha Beach on landing craft in the very first minutes of the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944. Read more...
[Posted: 2016-05-14 09:33:04]
Virginia Beach - Cary Lee Jarvis, 94, of Virginia Beach, died April 28, 2016
He was a staff sergeant when he landed D-Day, first wave, on Omaha beach, a member of the C-Battery of the 111th Artillery Battalion, 29th Division.  Read more...
[Posted: 2016-05-03 19:10:18]
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WALL - IN MEMORY OF: [See all Messages]
FERGUSON RICHARD J
66TH INFANTRY DIVISION
We have just learned that Jimmy Green has died. Sub-Lieutenant George Green carried the men of the A company
Honored by ashley ashley
[Posted: 2017-05-18 14:47:39]
MOTOEVICH JOSEPH
90TH INFANTRY DIVISION
I visited the cemetery at Normandy Beach 4-2017. My story is almost exactly like the post before mine. I am from Ohio and wanted to put my rose on the grave of an Ohio soldier. Having walked awhile and seeing a number of Ohio soldiers I chose to place mine at the stone of Joseph Motoevich. Somet
Honored by John Snyder
[Posted: 2017-05-10 02:33:03]
   1 - 2 / 97 messages   
OMAHA BEACH MEMORIAL - TESTIMONIES
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Sub-Lieut. George "Jimmy" Green

Royal Navy
551 LCA Flotilla


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A few minutes later we came upon a group of Landing Craft Tanks (LCTs) wallowing in the heavy seas and making about half our speed. I muttered something like 'What the hell are they doing here!' Taylor Fellers, who had been sitting on a bench with his men, joined me and told me the LCTs were carrying tanks scheduled to land before us and lead A Company up the beach. This was a complete surprise to me but it didn’t make much difference, as they had no hope of getting there on time. We left them in our wake and never saw them again.
It was beginning to get light and the bombardment by the battleships and cruisers had ceased. I could vaguely make out the French coast through the gloom and noticed puffs of smoke moving along the top of the cliffs. Dismissing the thought that it was the USS Texas emptying its gun barrels, I believed that it was a steam train puffing its way along the coast to Cherbourg.
It was approaching the time to form line abreast and make our dash for the shore. I turned round to see how the other craft were coping. I was just in time to see the bow of LCA 911 dipping into the sea and disappearing below the waves. I believe 911 had been damaged during the collision with 910, whilst lowering the boats from the Javelin. All the crew and soldiers had life jackets and I could only hope they would keep everyone afloat until I returned. It goes against the grain for a sailor to leave his comrades in the sea, but LCA 910 had no room and our orders were explicit that we were to leave survivors in the sea to be picked up later. It was essential to land on time.
A few minutes later as we neared the shore I picked out some nasty looking pill boxes and hoped they were not manned. A group of LCT(R)s - tank landing craft carrying rockets on their decks - came up behind me and launched all their rockets woefully short. Not one came anywhere near the shoreline. The heavy swell must have played havoc with their range finding. I remember shaking my fist in anger.
I then gave the signal to form line abreast and told signalman Webb to stop pumping and take cover. Martin pulled down the cover over his head and was guided by me through slits in his armour-plated cockpit. I was watching a particularly menacing looking pillbox at the mouth of the Vierville sur Mer draw in my binoculars and thinking that if it was manned we were going to be in trouble. There was a loud bang in my right ear and I turned to see a LCG (Landing Craft Gun) blazing away with its 4.7s and scoring direct hits on the pillbox. I wished it could have stayed longer but it disappeared as quickly as it had arrived. I had no idea we were getting support from other landing craft. One of the LCAs in the left flank was hit by an anti-tank bullet, passing through the armour plating on both sides of the boat and catching one of the American troops, who was vary badly injured.

Posted: July 16, 2011
Copyright: Laurent Lefebvre

George "Jimmy" Green - June 2009